• After novels about great artists’ wives Frida Kahlo and Dora Maar, Slavenka Drakulić writes another novel about a woman from the shadows. The novel about Milena Einstein is a novel of sorrow, of how to cope with misfortunes in life, how to live and survive, how to be a woman and not lose a sound mind.
  • Set in the eve of the Second World War, in early summer of 1938, with World Cup going on, this is a novel about important existential matters, about illness, about our relationship with the near and the dear ones and, of course, about football. This is also a story of Ernst Wilimowski, the only attacker who scored four goals for Poland playing against Brazil in this championship.
  • Travelling with Marko Pogačar, one of the most important Croatian poets of his generation, means being able to see the world as a blank map, reading a journey as if it were a road sonnet. What is today, in the times of Google Maps and Wikipedia, the travel genre after all? What is homeland and can it be picked, adopted or rejected along the road, at one’s will?
  • Night Drums is a novel and a study of a time and a man, Josip Gubernik, a little scrawny Austro-Hungarian forester and clerk, but even more of a lost era. In Night Drums, Sarajevo reflects in a magnificent metaphor like a drum on whose tight skin the entire 20th century pulsates.
  • Sarajevo, the City Map is neither a monument nor a scrapbook, not a tourist guide and not a travelogue - it is the city itself, the book which makes room for clockmakers and university professors, the locals and the doctors, for all those who have made history, but without a single line in any history dedicated to them. Sarajevo, the City Map is the book every city would like to have.
  • What if one morning a stranger who had previously shamelessly urinated on your wonderfully groomed lawn invited you to join him? This is one of those novels which put to your face a flickering smile, while Kubitschek, Mitzi the Cat and her owner Albert Albert stay etched in your memory in the manner of Don Quixote, Sancho Panza and Rocinante.
  • Luka Bekavac emerged as the author who pushes the limits and whose works are awaited eagerly. The Curfew establishes a new set of rules in Croatian literature. The already familiar author’s strategy of atypical use of science fiction and carefully (re)arranged factography acquires a new shade with this text: the lyrical, deceitfully intimate tone of a personal true story.
  • This is a novel about guilt and justice, about victims and the other ones, but most of all about the Roma people and their culture, about those on the margin whom we do not see, but are always in the middle of a tragedy.